I N T R O D U C T I O N


Ergonomics is the science of fitting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of the working population. Effective and successful "fits" assure high productivity, avoidance of illness and injury risks, and increased satisfaction among the workforce. Although the scope of ergonomics is much broader, the term here refers to assessing those work-related factors that may pose a risk of musculoskeletal disorders and recommendations to alleviate them. Common examples of ergonomic risk factors are found in jobs requiring repetitive, forceful, or prolonged exertions of the hands; frequent or heavy lifting, pushing, pulling, or carrying of heavy objects; and prolonged awkward postures. Vibration and cold may add risk to these work conditions. Jobs or working conditions presenting multiple risk factors will have a higher probability of causing a musculoskeletal problem. The level of risk depends on the intensity, frequency, and duration of the exposure to these conditions and the individuals' capacity to meet the force of other job demands that might be involved.                                            

 

TIPS FOR COMPUTER USERS

Repetitive and prolonged use of a computer keyboard and/or mouse can lead to muscle aches and discomfort. Posture and positioning are important. Try to incorporate the following tips into your work style to avoid problems.

 Maintain good posture when working. Sit all the way back in the chair against the backrest. Keep your knees equal to, or lower, than your hips with your feet supported.

Keep your elbows in a slightly open angle (100° to 110°) with your wrists in a straight position. The keyboard tilt can help you attain the correct arm position. A negative tilt (front of keyboard higher than back) helps when working in upright sitting positions. If you recline, a positive tilt (front of the keyboard lower than the back) might be necessary.

Avoid overreaching. Keep the mouse and keyboard within close reach. Center the most frequently used section of the keyboard directly in front of you.

Center the monitor in front of you at arm's length distance and position the top of the monitor 2” to 3” above seated eye level. You should be able to view the screen without turning or tilting your head up or down.

Use good typing technique. Float your arms above the keyboard and keep your wrist straight when keying. If you use a wrist rest, use it to support your palms when pausing, not while keying.

Hit the keyboard keys with light force. The average user keys four times harder than necessary

 

Virtual Ergonomic Evaluation (VEE)

VEE Procedure

STEP
1
 
 

Repetitive Motion Injury (RMI) Prevention Training 

    • Employees MUST have this mandatory training completed (within 3 years) prior to requesting an assessment (unless approved by the Ergonomic Coordinator) 
     
STEP 
2
 

Pre- Ergonomic Evaluation Form 

    • Form needs to be completely filled out by the employee and forwarded to their Supervisor/Manager 
    • Department Supervisor / Manager MUST submit the completed form to their respective Safety Division Coordinator via email
     
STEP
 

Await further instruction from Safety 

    • Questions or concerns contact your assigned Safety Coordinator or;
      • Safety Division Office 951-955-3520
      • RUHS Safety Department 951-486-4689 



 

CHAIRS

Herman Miller  Hon 
User Guide Information

Ambi

Embody 

Mirra

Ergon 3

SAYL

 Volt-Task
Size / Fit Reference  

Laptop - Ergonomics